British PM is considered to have underestimated the death of Covid

British PM is considered to have underestimated the death of Covid

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson refused to tighten Covid-19 restrictions last fall. According to Former Chief Counsel, Dominic Cummings, Johnson thought the people who died and were dying were over 80 years old.

UMMATIMES - In addition, Johnson prefers handling the economic sector rather than Covid-19. The claim appeared in an interview with BBC Editor Laura Kuenssberg. This moment was the first time Cummings gave a one-on-one TV interview during his career in politics.

Cummings said ahead of the start of the pandemic last year, Johnson wanted to keep holding weekly face-to-face meetings with the Queen. Johnson is also seen as defending his controversial decision to go to his parents' farm in County Durham after the first lockdown began.

Covid-19 cases, which declined last summer but began to rise rapidly as autumn began, sparked debate within the government about what action was needed.

Cummings said he along with Britain's Chief Scientific Adviser Sir Patrick Vallance and England's Chief Medical Officer Professor Chris Whitty had pushed for tighter restrictions from mid-September.

On 13 October with Covid-19 deaths rising to more than 100 per day, Labor leader Sir Keir Starmer called for a two to three week lockdown. However, the government decided against it.

In a WhatsApp message sent on October 15, Johnson was slightly shaken to learn the number of patients who had died from Covid-19. He rated the median age of dying patients to be between 81 and 85 years and was rated as above life expectancy.

“Almost no one under the age of 60 is admitted to hospital and among them almost all of them survived. Guys, I think we may need to make a small change. This shows we are not implementing a national lockdown," the statement said.

However, on October 31, the prime minister announced a four-week lockdown that would begin on November 5. This action was taken to protect the NHS because the death toll could reach thousands per day.

On Tuesday, Business Secretary Paul Scully defended Johnson's actions over the fall. He added that economic restrictions also have an impact on people's health and lives so it is necessary to consider all factors. "The Welsh lockdown, which was introduced about two weeks before England's fall lockdown, didn't have a very big effect," he said.British PM is considered to have underestimated the death of Covid

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson refused to tighten Covid-19 restrictions last fall. According to Former Chief Counsel, Dominic Cummings, Johnson thought the people who died and were dying were over 80 years old.

In addition, Johnson prefers handling the economic sector rather than Covid-19. The claim appeared in an interview with BBC Editor Laura Kuenssberg. This moment was the first time Cummings gave a one-on-one TV interview during his career in politics.

Cummings said ahead of the start of the pandemic last year, Johnson wanted to keep holding weekly face-to-face meetings with the Queen. Johnson is also seen as defending his controversial decision to go to his parents' farm in County Durham after the first lockdown began.

Covid-19 cases, which declined last summer but began to rise rapidly as autumn began, sparked debate within the government about what action was needed.

Cummings said he along with Britain's Chief Scientific Adviser Sir Patrick Vallance and England's Chief Medical Officer Professor Chris Whitty had pushed for tighter restrictions from mid-September.

On 13 October with Covid-19 deaths rising to more than 100 per day, Labor leader Sir Keir Starmer called for a two to three week lockdown. However, the government decided against it.

In a WhatsApp message sent on October 15, Johnson was slightly shaken to learn the number of patients who had died from Covid-19. He rated the median age of dying patients to be between 81 and 85 years and was rated as above life expectancy.

“Almost no one under the age of 60 is admitted to hospital and among them almost all of them survived. Guys, I think we may need to make a small change. This shows we are not implementing a national lockdown," the statement said.

However, on October 31, the prime minister announced a four-week lockdown that would begin on November 5. This action was taken to protect the NHS because the death toll could reach thousands per day.

On Tuesday, Business Secretary Paul Scully defended Johnson's actions over the fall. He added that economic restrictions also have an impact on people's health and lives so it is necessary to consider all factors. "The Welsh lockdown, which was introduced about two weeks before England's fall lockdown, didn't have a very big effect," he said.